Negotiating the Demands of High-Stakes Testing: Graduate Students' Experiences as Teachers Preparing Students for Standardized Assessments in Reading and Language Arts

Authors

  • Andrew P. Huddleston University of Georgia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.56887/galiteracy.68

Keywords:

high-stakes testing, progressive education, pedagogical beliefs

Abstract

This qualitative interview study examined the experiences of four language and literacy education Ph.D. students, as classroom teachers, preparing students for high-stakes testing in public schools. Two of the participants taught in a western U.S. state while the other two currently teach in a southeastern state. The findings revealed that the participants supported progressive education practices. However, the teachers in the in the western state indicated that their state's lower-stakes testing program coincided with their beliefs about teaching and furthered their teaching goals while the teachers in the southeastern state felt that their state's higher-stakes testing program conflicted with their beliefs and hindered their teaching. Participants' approaches for negotiating the demands of testing with their pedagogical beliefs are described.

Author Biography

  • Andrew P. Huddleston, University of Georgia

    Andrew Huddleston ([email protected]) is a Ph.D. candidate in Language and Literacy Education at the University of Georgia. He taught fifth and sixth grade reading and language arts for six years in Texas. His research interests include examining how teachers, administrators, parents, and students are responding to high-stakes testing policies in reading and language arts.

     

Negotiating the Demands of High-Stakes Testing

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Published

10/30/2011

Issue

Section

Research and Practitioner Articles

How to Cite

Huddleston, A. P. (2011). Negotiating the Demands of High-Stakes Testing: Graduate Students’ Experiences as Teachers Preparing Students for Standardized Assessments in Reading and Language Arts. Georgia Journal of Literacy, 34(1), 36-44. https://doi.org/10.56887/galiteracy.68

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